12 secrets of dog groomers

A lot of bad fur has been prevented by dog ​​caregivers. The people who keep the scissors at your local pet salon are experts in keeping puppies neat out there, but transportation is only one part of the job. Doggroomers are also confident in handling troublesome personalities – both of the four-legged clients and their owners. We spoke to three groomers working in the U.S. about the most challenging breeds to care for, their tricks for dealing with difficult clients, and other hairy aspects of the profession.

1. THERE ARE MANY ROUTES TO DOG GROOMING.

Technically, dog groomers do not need a license or certification to operate in the US Despite the law, most groomers complete training before they start working professionally. According to Page Petravich, a groomer at Ravenswoof in Chicago, there are many paths to take. “There is no one place where you can get proof letters to become a groomer,” he tells Mental Floss. “There are countless seminars and workshops that can provide certificates of education and such, but the most important way people learn about care is through care academies.”

Courses for nursing academy usually last six months to a year, and upon completion of the curriculum, graduates receive a certificate. Some groomers give up formal lessons altogether and learn from students. Unless your groomer has a license or certificate on their wall, the only way to know their credentials is to ask.

2. SMALL DOGS CAN BE THE MOST CHALLENGING TO BE FREE.

Each trimmer has a dog breed that makes them tense when they see it through the door. For Nicholas Vanet, a groomer at Island Pet Resort in Staten Island, New York, this breed is husky. “Huskies are the ones who always cry for help,” he tells Mental Floss. “I could wash the dog, and they will cry when I take a scissors and stab him.” Despite his idiosyncrasies, he still has a soft spot for the focal race. “These dogs are probably the greatest drama queens I know, but they are the best. I still love them.”

For Kimberly Ives, a groomer at Puff & Fluff in Phoenix, Arizona, terror comes in a smaller package. She tells Mental Floss, “You can never predict a Chihuahua. They could be the sweetest Chihuahua and they could be the most stubborn Chihuahua that will turn and bite your finger off.”

3. DOG TRIMERS MUST ALSO BE ABOUT THE OCCASIONAL CAT.

Although dogs can be annoying customers, dog clients are rarely treated as badly as cats. Cats do not appear as often in the pet salon, but when they do, groomers are up for a challenge. “They’re not like dogs. Cats just want to be left alone,” Vanet says. “You have to have two people to take care of a cat, because if you’re alone, it’s impossible.”

4. PEANUTBUTTER IS THE BEST FRIEND OF A DOG TRIMMER.

If a dog would rather be somewhere other than get a trim, groomers have a trick to stimulate their mood. “If the dog has no allergies and it’s OK-ed by the pet parent, a few people in my salon like to use peanut butter or a treat as a form of positive reinforcement for doing nails, or really doing something. [the dogs] do not want to do, “says Petravich.

For Vanet, peanut butter comes in handy during bath time. “When I give them a bath and they try to move a lot, I actually take peanut butter and put it on the wall,” he says. “[I use] a small toy that I hold against the wall, and they start to swallow it to distract them from moving. “

5. DOG GROOMERS DREAD SHAVING POODLES

Some breeds are difficult to care for because of the type of hairstyle needed, not their temperament. A classic French poodle cut – with puffs of fur and a shaved face and legs – is the worst nightmare of a groomer. According to Petravich, “There are many varieties of standard capsules for poodles, such as the one you see in dog shows called a Historically Correct Continental – it’s very difficult to perform.” This type of haircut is rarely requested, but many dog ​​owners still want to shave their dogs’ feet and faces – this can be annoying. “It takes a lot of patience and a lot of practice,” he says. “You have to be very careful to get in between the toes.”

6. THE NUMBER OF DOGS THAT THEY CARE IN A DAY.

Because the size of a trim depends on the animal, many groomers do not know how busy their day will be until they get to work. “When I come in, I’ll look at my schedule and just see what my schedule looks like for the day,” Ives says. “I see if I have big dogs, small dogs, and prepare myself mentally for what I will be treated with today.”

According to Petravich, planning a full day of care can be a complicated process. “When I get four big scribbles in, I’ll kind of only take care of the scribbles all day, but if I have four smaller dogs like shih tzus or small schnauzers, I can usually do that plus some bigger dogs,” he says. “It all depends on how big they are, how long the coat is, the kind of hairstyle they want, the dog’s temperament, and really how much I can do in an eight hour day.”

7. DOG GROOMERS GET GUM UNUSE STYLE VERSES.

Pet owners often get involved in applying looks that are not always taught at care academies. “The mule – that’s actually a popular trend right now,” says Ives. Petravich, meanwhile, has “received a few mohawk requests.”

Sometimes the most bizarre jobs that groomers are given are what they are asked not to do. “A lot of people like to let the lashes grow on goldendoodles, who believe it may or may not grow up to 6 inches,” says Petravich. “It gets to a point where we just have to cut them a little shorter so they can eat without their lashes getting into their food.”

8. DOG GROOMERS HAVE STRATEGIES FOR SHORT HAIRED PUPS, TOO.

Owners of naturally short-haired dogs may think they can skip the groomers, but these pets can still benefit from a professional haircut. When caring for Chihuahuas, labs and pugs, groomers rely on a method called carding. Using a small comb, she polishes the dog’s bottom coat so that the smooth top coat lies flat. In addition to giving the dog a neater appearance, carding also removes the small hair that dogs are more likely to shed.

9. SOMTS SHAVING A DOG IS THE ONLY OPTION OF A GROOMER.

When a pet groomer tells you that they need to shave your pet, they want you to know that they are not taking the easy way out. Brushing out matte fur is more difficult than it is worth – for both the groomer and the pet.

“Some pet parents ask that we not shave mats,” Petravich says. “A lot of people think that when we shave dogs that have mats, it’s the groomers’ laziness that we do not want to brush the dogs out and do a long haircut. I think a lot of people think we’re lying to them about the seriousness of things, when in reality we are just trying to do what is best for the dog, what is best for its health. “

According to Ives, mats can be prevented with good maintenance at home, but many pet owners ignore the problem and leave it to the trimmers. “Nine times out of 10 people comb their dogs well. As trimmers we try to teach our customers how to take good care of their dogs at home between grooming, but some people do not accept our advice. Do not want their dogs shear in other words, and sometimes that’s our only option to do so, because of how heavy the mat is. “

10. KNOWLING HONOR IS A SKIN JOB – EVEN FOR BEER LOVERS.

For animal lovers, spending the whole day with cute dogs can be like a dream job. But professional pet groomers say the work is more strenuous than it seems, despite how much they love their hairy clients. “A lot of people always ask me, ‘Oh, your job has to be that easy – honestly, how hard can it be to take care of a dog?'” Vanet says. “What people do not notice is that this is not just a dog where it sits still for you and you can take care of them. They are not like people where you can ask them what they want and do it.”

The unpredictable and sometimes non-cooperative nature of clients means that a day of pet care can be a workout. “[It’s] a very physically demanding job, even if you do dogs that are just under 20 kilos, “says Petravich,” You stand all day, you have to pick up this dog all the time to go from place to place. “It’s very physically demanding, and also mentally draining when you try to explain to the pet parents that we need to remove the mats on your dog’s hair because it’s uncomfortable.”

11. DOG CLOTHES WANT PET-ENDERS TO DO THEIR RESEARCH.

When choosing a breed, potential pet parents often look for qualities such as size, appearance and personality. Pet groomers beg owners to consider the care needs of a dog as well before bringing one into their home. Different breeds require different levels of maintenance, and monthly trips to the groomer only provide so much. “If you’re going to a specific breed that requires a lot of care and maintenance, just make sure you do your research, and find the groomer that works best for you, and generally just be educated about the race, “says Ives. “Do not just get a dog to get a dog.”

12. FIRST-TIME CUSTOMERS CAN MOST FREE TO KNOW.

For all the challenging moments they face, dog groomers have many experiences that remind them of what attracted them to the job in the first place. The dramatic transformations that take place in the salon are the perfect example of the power of a good bridesmaid. According to Ives, “Taking a rescue dog, or something like that, they get scared in every mat, not knowing what’s going on, not even getting used to the grooming experience, and then you shave those mats off, you get that dog looking and feel the best you can, and her little personality comes out. That’s absolutely rewarding. “

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