That kind of fan – review nerd

Evaluation:
5/10
?

  • 1 – Absolutely hot garbage
  • 2 – Black lukewarm garbage
  • 3 – Highly flawed design
  • 4 – Some advantages, lots of disadvantages
  • 5 – Acceptably imperfect
  • 6 – Good enough to buy on sale
  • 7 – Great, but not the best in the class
  • 8 – Fantastic, with some footnotes
  • 9 – Shut up and take my money
  • 10 – Absolute design Nirvana

Price: $ 59.00

Zephyr Pro mouse on white desk
Erik Schoon

Gimmicks are found in all industries, usually as a result of companies throwing things at a wall to see what’s hanging on. Some of these work, others do not, but Marsback has a new one it will sell in the Zephyr Pro. Although it may look normal from the outside, it has a fan inside to cool your hands.

Here’s what we like

  • Comfortable hardware
  • Good RGB and reprogramming options
  • Bright light

And what we do not do

  • Overpriced
  • Weak fan
  • Rough software UI

Which on the surface seems like a good idea. But sold for $ 59.00, which is a decent amount to spend on a gaming mouse, Zephyr Pro’s appeal is starting to wane. Fortunately, this is a second-generation product, so the idea of ​​”gaming mice with a fan” has been refined a bit, and who knows, maybe it will just be enough to make it worth buying.

A decent foundation

Zephyr Pro does not do much to reinvent the wheel, but it’s as much of a good thing as it’s boring. The mouse is made of completely black (or white) matte plastic with a design with an open back and pieces of RGB light that top out of the bottom and the scroll wheel. It looks like many other lightweight gaming mice and even weighs 59 grams, but smaller touches like the randomized design of the holes give it some extra character.

Side view of Zephyr Pro on a white desk
Erik Schoon

The side buttons are shinier than the rest of the mouse and protrude a bit, making them easy to find with your thumb. They are as responsive as you could wish for, and the same goes for the smaller DPI button located on the top of the mouse. The scroll wheel is pretty standard with a gripping rubber coating for precise movements, but I would say it has become loose during my use of the mouse. I can easily move it around inside the mouse case to the left and right, and although it still works fine, it’s worrying that it came loose after a month of use. There are also two buttons on the bottom of the mouse: one to turn the RGB on / off and the other to turn the fan on / off.

Besides that, the rest of the mouse is a solid, if expected package. The exterior does nothing to pull you in, but it does enough to be viable. It is comfortably shaped for both right-handed and left-handed users (even though it only has side buttons on the right side), fits well in the hands, and all the buttons are quick to use. Although the hard plastic housing in no way makes it feel premium, it is enough for long-term use. And I’m glad the hardware was played as safe as it was because the real star of the show is what Marsback has put into it.

Fanen…

The fan inside the Zephyr Pro is something Marsback is clearly proud of. It’s a big focus on mouse marketing and is perhaps the only thing that makes this mouse stand out from the hundreds of other options on the market. Marsback claims that this fan will cool your hands off to avoid palm sweat, and that it also helps make the mouse “sweat safe”. I’ve never had or heard of a mouse that breaks down due to sweat damage, so I’m not 100% sure what that means, but no matter what, does the fan work?

Well, it turns on when the mouse is connected, but other than that, I’m not blown backwards.

Close-up of the Zephyr Pro's internal fan
Erik Schoon

Due to the size of the mouse, this fan is of course very small – barely an inch and a half wide. Not surprisingly, this means that the power it emits is not very impressive. You can feel it when it first spins, but it blows barely enough and certainly not enough to make a noticeable effect. While the mouse may feel a little cooler than a normal one due to the fan, it is such a small difference that you will not notice it even after a few minutes of using the mouse.

You may be worried about noise here, and while that’s something worth discussing, it’s not enough to bother you. The fan is not very high, but it can make its presence known in a quiet room if it barely. It can also make the mouse vibrate a bit, but for some reason it was far less consistent. I can only assume that the fan rotates faster at random times as there are no options on the mouse or in the software to adjust its spin speed.

Now the Pro mouse is not the first of its kind, Marsback made yet another mouse before this one with a similar fan, and this is the next generation model. Two of the direct upgrades that the Zephyr Pro received is that its fan is quieter and vibrates less, which I can only assume was successful, but it still vibrates and produces noise. Although neither the noise nor the vibrations are enough to bother you in everyday life, it casts an unfortunate light on the fan’s lack of usability. Overall, it just feels like a symbolic gesture to be unique without being completely thought out.

Deeply customizable

I never want anything good about a product to go unnoticed, so let’s talk about the (exclusive Windows) Marsback software you can use with Zephyr Pro. It is without a doubt the best part of the mouse, though it does nothing remarkable. The design is a bit rough around the edges, but the tools present are solid, so you can customize everything from the function of the buttons to DPI settings.

The lighting and macro features are likely to be the biggest draw for most people. Here you can choose a variety of lighting effects, all of which are quite customizable.

Lighting section of Zephyr Pro software

On the other hand, the macro tools did not work for me no matter what I tried – it would not record input from any device when I tried to create a macro and I’m not sure what’s wrong. Now this may just be a strange bug with my system or my review of the mouse, so I will not condemn it too much. I was only able to find another review of someone with the same problem, so I’m willing to accept it as a random mistake, but still a notable mistake.

Even without the macro functionality, it is still a feature-rich piece of software that goes a long way toward improving the mouse. It’s not best in class or unique, but it’s good.

Just buy a normal mouse

All said and done, the Zephyr Pro does very little to get me to recommend it. While not really fumbling anything, everything is just a little bit off and I think a lot of it comes down to the price. You can get some pretty solid budget gaming mice today – and when I say budget, I mean less than $ 30. Meanwhile, the Marsback offers Zephyr Pro for $ 59.00. The hardware feels cheaper than it should for the price, the software has some great features but is really rough and I’ve made my thoughts on this thing’s inclusion of a fan probably too obvious.

The simple fact is that there are so many alternatives available that picking up the Zephyr Pro feels like a waste. A mouse from a more productive brand like Razer can deliver more polished software features, and companies like Redragon have been producing quality-budget gaming mice for years. Even if you have some really sweaty palms and are desperate for a solution, I do not think this mouse is going to solve anything. It’s a cheap mouse that is sold for a premium, all the while announcing an albeit unique feature that does not add much value.

In a market that is as competitive and crowded as the peripheral gaming space is, I would like to stand out in a reasonable goal – I just wish the good parts of the mouse stood out in my mind more than the bad ones .

Evaluation: 5/10

Price: $ 59.00

Here’s what we like

  • Comfortable hardware
  • Good RGB and reprogramming options
  • Bright light

And what we do not do

  • Overpriced
  • Weak fan
  • Rough software UI

Leave a Comment